The Ruins of Bam

Translated by Idra Novey and Ahmad Nadalizadeh
                                        For the city of Bam destroyed in the 2003 earthquake

The window is black
the table, black
the sky, black
the snow, black
You’re mistaken!
I don’t need medicine
or a psychotherapist.
Just lift these stones,
sweep aside the earth
and look into my eyes!

My eyes
that are round like the Earth

an image of the world
the world of shut doors
of countless walls

anytime I stand before the mirror
the image of an upside-down tortoise
makes me long for a passer-by
to arrive and invert the world

Some night
our hands will tremble from all this solitude
and our depiction on the canvas
will be scribbled out

the ruins of Bam scribbled out
the shelters we built
collapsing on our heads

I am terrified by the next images in this poem
the image of God lifting all the doors onto his shoulders
getting away
retreating far and then farther

I write: one day
the missing keys will be recovered.
What should we do about the missing locks.
 




The Ruins of Bam (Original Persian)
The Ruins of Bam (Original Persian)

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Sun

Blistered apple,
gold that molts

the eye & boils
animals in their caves.

I touch & touch

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branding the hands
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A circle
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I see death all
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          charred blue,

          cast against
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The body’s ash already
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          unglittering
          in its cheap velvet.

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          of your borrowed light.

Let me ignite
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