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today's poet
Craig Santos Perez

understory (week 35)

About this Poem 

“This poem is an excerpt from a weekly series of poems I wrote during my wife’s pregnancy. The title, ‘understory,’ refers to plants and young trees that grow beneath the main canopy of a jungle or forest.”

—Craig Santos Perez

understory (week 35)

Craig Santos Perez
“she’s kicking”
nālani says 
 
holds my
hands against
 
her belly 
so warm! 
 
chicken broth
boils in
 
the crockpot
bones turn
 
in briny 
liquid—baby
 
kicks again
can she
 
feel my
body heat? 
 
magma rises
water into
 
steam—Kīlauea 
drill, turbine
 
Mauna Loa
grid, undersea
 
cables—is
geothermal safe? 
 
baby’s so 
active tonight 
 
nālani presses
my palms
 
deeper into
this skin
 
drum e
Pele e

Copyright @ 2014 by Craig Santos Perez. Used with permission of the author. This poem appeared in Poem-a-Day on July 22, 2014.

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For a more thorough exploration of our theme, check out W. T. Pfefferle's anthology Poets on Place: Essays & Tales from the Road.

Photo credit: Brian Palmer
Photo credit: Larry Fink
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