Published on Academy of American Poets (https://poets.org)


In Toledo, the Sequestered Brides of Christ


In Toledo, the sequestered brides of Christ make marzipan. And devotees like me buy up the sweets via a three-chambered lazy Susan in an alley. Hear a voice but glimpse not the heavenly hands, an enterprise both savvy and vaguely eucharistic. “To taste the kingdom in a crumb of dough,” I say, a privilege to misquote Blake, even if it’s only to myself. The recipe dates back to the Court of the Caliphs, as alchemic as it is simple. Shouldn’t every traveler make a habit of eating earth, wind, air, and fire? Not to mention almonds, which must equal 50 percent by weight to pass muster with Toledo inspectors. I pay, turn the lazy Susan, and walk away with my own tin of marzipan, the abbess’s unseen blessing dusting each morsel. “Eat and be made whole,” I can almost hear her say. The body of Christ is a fish—delicious. And now a star, like the one that guided wandering kings. And now a sword, two-edged, like matters of belief. And now—forgive me—my Lord is a serpent. Spiraling in on himself like vortex or Milky Way, my faith quickening as God’s scales dissolve on my tongue.

Credit


Copyright © 2017 Lance Larsen. Used with permission of the author. This poem originally appeared in The Southern Review, Summer 2017.

Author


Lance Larsen

Lance Larsen is the author of Genius Loci (University of Tampa Press, 2013).

Date Published: 2017-10-17

Source URL: https://poets.org/poem/toledo-sequestered-brides-christ