Published on Academy of American Poets (https://poets.org)


The Waiting

I was waiting for something
to arrive. I didn’t know what.
Something buoyed, something
sun knocked. I placed my palms
up, little pads of butter, expecting.
All day, nothing. Longer than
that. My hair grew, fell out,
grew. Outside my window, I felt
the flick of a tail in September
wind. A bobcat sauntered across
the grass before me, the black tip
of its tail a pencil I’d like to sharpen.
I immediately hushed, crouched,
became a crumpled shock of
joy to see something this wild,
not myself. It turned to look
at me, its body muscular in
the turning. In its mouth was
the tail of a mouse drained of
blood, dangling diorama of death.
Sharp eyes looking at me and then,
not. Its lack of fear, its slow stroll
across the stream’s bridge, fur
lacquering its teeth. Sometimes
what comes to us, we never called
for. How long had I been crouched
like that? I stood up, blood rush
trumpeting. My arms wrapped
themselves around myself, lifted.
It was as if a bank vault had
opened and I was just standing
there, stealing nothing.

Credit


Copyright © 2021 by Jane Wong. Originally published in Poem-a-Day on May 17, 2021, by the Academy of American Poets.

About this Poem


“I wrote ‘The Waiting’ during a writing residency in Wyoming back in 2019. I was having trouble writing. Honestly, I was probably avoiding a difficult poem within me. With a blank page on my desk, I looked out the window and saw a bobcat kill a mouse right in front of me. It looked at me, as if to say: “what are you looking at?” Then I wrote this poem, which is also an ars poetica.”
Jane Wong

Author


Jane Wong

Jane Wong is the author of How to Not Be Afraid of Everything (Alice James, 2021) and Overpour (Action Books, 2016). She is an Associate Professor of Creative Writing at Western Washington University and lives in Bellingham, Washington.

Date Published: 2021-05-17

Source URL: https://poets.org/poem/waiting