Published on Academy of American Poets (https://poets.org)


When Moonlike Ore the Hazure Seas

  When moonlike ore the hazure seas
    In soft effulgence swells,
  When silver jews and balmy breaze
    Bend down the Lily's bells;
  When calm and deap, the rosy sleep
    Has lapt your soal in dreems,
  R Hangeline! R lady mine!
    Dost thou remember Jeames?

  I mark thee in the Marble All,
    Where England's loveliest shine—
  I say the fairest of them hall
    Is Lady Hangeline.
  My soul, in desolate eclipse,
    With recollection teems—
  And then I hask, with weeping lips,
    Dost thou remember Jeames?

  Away! I may not tell thee hall
    This soughring heart endures—
  There is a lonely sperrit-call
    That Sorrow never cures;
  There is a little, little Star,
    That still above me beams;
  It is the Star of Hope—but ar!
    Dost thou remember Jeames?

Credit


This poem is in the public domain. 

About this Poem


From Ballads and Songs (London: Cassell and Company, 1896).

 

Author


William Makepeace Thackeray

William Makepeace Thackeray, born July 18, 1811, was an English writer best known for his novels, particularly The History of Henry Esmond, Esq. (The Mershon Company Publishers, 1852) and Vanity Fair (Bradbury and Evans, 1848). While in school, Thackeray began writing poems, which he published in a number of magazines, chiefly Fraser and Punch. He died on December 24, 1863.

Date Published: 2018-07-11

Source URL: https://poets.org/poem/when-moonlike-ore-hazure-seas