Published on Academy of American Poets (https://poets.org)


From Pocahontas

  Returning from the cruel fight
  How pale and faint appears my knight!
  He sees me anxious at his side;
  "Why seek, my love, your wounds to hide?
  Or deem your English girl afraid
  To emulate the Indian maid?"

  Be mine my husband's grief to cheer
  In peril to be ever near;
  Whate'er of ill or woe betide,
  To bear it clinging at his side;
  The poisoned stroke of fate to ward,
  His bosom with my own to guard:
  Ah! could it spare a pang to his,
  It could not know a purer bliss!
  'Twould gladden as it felt the smart,
  And thank the hand that flung the dart!

Credit


This poem is in the public domain. 

About this Poem


From Ballads and Songs (London: Cassell and Company, 1896).

 

Author


William Makepeace Thackeray

William Makepeace Thackeray, born July 18, 1811, was an English writer best known for his novels, particularly The History of Henry Esmond, Esq. (The Mershon Company Publishers, 1852) and Vanity Fair (Bradbury and Evans, 1848). While in school, Thackeray began writing poems, which he published in a number of magazines, chiefly Fraser and Punch. He died on December 24, 1863.

Date Published: 2018-07-11

Source URL: https://poets.org/poem/pocahontas-0