Published on Academy of American Poets (https://poets.org)


The Caïque

  Yonder to the kiosk, beside the creek,
  Paddle the swift caque.
  Thou brawny oarsman with the sunburnt cheek,
  Quick! for it soothes my heart to hear the Bulbul speak.

  Ferry me quickly to the Asian shores,
  Swift bending to your oars.
  Beneath the melancholy sycamores,
  Hark! what a ravishing note the lovelorn Bulbul pours.

  Behold, the boughs seem quivering with delight,
  The stars themselves more bright,
  As mid the waving branches out of sight
  The Lover of the Rose sits singing through the night.

  Under the boughs I sat and listened still,
  I could not have my fill.
  "How comes," I said, "such music to his bill?
  Tell me for whom he sings so beautiful a trill."

  "Once I was dumb," then did the Bird disclose,
  "But looked upon the Rose;
  And in the garden where the loved one grows,
  I straightway did begin sweet music to compose."

  "O bird of song, there's one in this caque
  The Rose would also seek,
  So he might learn like you to love and speak."
  Then answered me the bird of dusky beak,
  "The Rose, the Rose of Love blushes on Leilah's cheek."

Credit


This poem is in the public domain. 

About this Poem


From Ballads and Songs (London: Cassell and Company, 1896).

 

Author


William Makepeace Thackeray

William Makepeace Thackeray, born July 18, 1811, was an English writer best known for his novels, particularly The History of Henry Esmond, Esq. (The Mershon Company Publishers, 1852) and Vanity Fair (Bradbury and Evans, 1848). While in school, Thackeray began writing poems, which he published in a number of magazines, chiefly Fraser and Punch. He died on December 24, 1863.

Date Published: 2018-07-11

Source URL: https://poets.org/poem/caique