Published on Academy of American Poets (https://poets.org)


Captive

They have torn the gold tettinx
From my hair;
And wrenched the bronze sandals
From my ankles.

They have taken from me my friend
Who knew the holy wisdom of poets,
Who had drunk at the feast
Where Simonides sang.

No more do I walk the calm gardens
In the white mist of olives;
No more do I take the rose-crown
From the white hands of a maiden.

I, who was free, am a slave;
The Muses have forgotten me,
The gods do not hear me.

Here there are no flowers to love;
But afar off I dream that I see
Bent poppies and the deathless asphodel. 

Credit


This poem is in the public domain.

Author


Richard Aldington

Richard Aldington was born in Hampshire, England, in 1892. An early member of the Imagist movement, he was the author of War and Love (1915-1919) (The Four Seas Company, 1919), Images (The Egoist, 1919), and numerous other books of poetry and prose.

Date Published: 2018-11-11

Source URL: https://poets.org/poem/captive